Frequently Asked Questions

We welcome your feedback on ways to enhance the utility of MAP-IT. Please contact us at MANDATEproject@rti.org to help make it the most relevant tool for your work.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about MAP-IT.

General Questions

  1. What is MAP-IT?
  2. MAP-IT is a decision support tool that helps to inform the development of appropriate and effective technologies and strategies to reduce pediatric (ages 0-14) tuberculosis (TB) mortality in low-resource settings, with emphasis on a few high burden countries. As an interactive, quantitative model, MAP-IT enables users to compare the potential number of lives saved based on the availability, utilization and efficacy of technologies in different care settings.

  3. How do I use MAP-IT?
  4. Tutorials on how to use MAP-IT efficiently and effectively are available here. If you have additional questions, please contact us at mandateproject@rti.org.

  5. What MAP-IT is not…
  6. MAP-IT is designed to address the major interventions associated with pediatric TB. It is not designed to address the following: adult TB, or a cost-benefit analysis. We welcome feedback on areas that users identify as important to enhance the utility of MAP-IT. Please contact us for feedback at mandateproject@rti.org to help us continue to make this a relevant tool for your work.

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Questions about MAP-IT Care Settings

  1. MAP-IT uses community, public and private for its settings. What is the definition of each setting?
  2. MAP-IT defines settings by location (i.e. community, public and private):

    • The community setting is care in the child’s home or community and is defined as having a very limited availability of skilled providers and no cesarean or surgical capabilities. Most care received in the community setting is through contact tracing or community outreach workers.
    • The public setting is defined as healthcare facilities that are run by the government. These facilities often participate in a national TB program(NTP).
    • The private setting is defined as healthcare facilities that are privately owned and operated and not run by the government. These facilities often do not participate in a national TB program (non-NTP).

  3. Throughout the MAP-IT model there are opportunities for transfer. What does transfer mean?
  4. MAP-IT created a transfer option in the Web model to allow users to change the rates of use of health facilities. For example, children identified as likely having TB through contact tracing may transfer from their homes or communities to a public or private facility to initiate their TB treatments.

    Transfer rates may be affected by multiple factors, including transport availability, health access, community norms, personal beliefs, health cost, and ability of a child's family and/or provider to recognize and diagnose health conditions that require additional care.

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Questions about Technology

  1. MAP-IT uses the terms penetration, utilization and efficacy for each intervention. What do these terms mean?
  2. Penetration, utilization, and efficacy are important to the impact of an intervention:

    • Penetration is the availability of an intervention in a given setting.
    • Utilization is the rate of appropriate use of an intervention in a given setting when available.
    • Efficacy is the ability of an intervention to achieve a successful outcome given the intended purpose, such as successfully preventing, diagnosing or treating a condition.

  3. What factors influence penetration?
  4. The availability of an intervention can vary, depending on multiple factors, including the cost of an intervention, supply chain disturbances, demand, health policy, and the availability of health workers.

  5. What factors influence utilization?
  6. The appropriate use of an intervention can be affected by multiple factors, including the following:

    • Functionality of the intervention
    • Lack of knowledge
    • Cultural/health beliefs
    • Severity/timing of disease
    • Standards of protocol

  7. When would efficacy rates be adjusted?
  8. Efficacy rates reflect the ability of an intervention to perform its function— such as to prevent, diagnose, or treat a condition— successfully under ideal conditions. Efficacy rates may be adjusted to explore the impact on lives saved of changes that are made to an intervention to make it more efficacious.

  9. How do penetration, utilization, efficacy, and transfer relate to each other?
  10. The penetration, utilization, efficacy, and transfer factors are interactive. Here are some examples:

    • An improved intervention may have a higher efficacy rate. If, however, that new intervention is more complex to use appropriately, the utilization rate may be reduced.
    • If the new intervention is more expensive, the penetration rate may be reduced because of inadequate funding for widespread availability.
    • Education to use a diagnostic tool or procedure better may result in more women transferring to a different care setting.

    MAP-IT allows users to evaluate the relative impact of these factors on maternal, fetal, and neonatal mortality.

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Need more help?

If you have additional questions, concerns or comments, we can help! Please contact us at MANDATEproject@rti.org.